Category Archives: Participant Interviews

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MYT Participant Interview: Darren Slosberg

How did you hear about MYT and its EQ work?
Fortunately, we found the MYT program through a workshop for the Inc. 500 fastest growing business which we were lucky enough to be a part of.

What was your first experience like?
Very insightful.  It allowed me to look at things as “opportunities for growth” instead of frustrations and road blocks.

How did you react to your IDP and do you still refer to it?
The only way for the IDP program to work is to be open to it and be aware that we can all change for the better.  This is the one program I found that whatever you put into it, you will get out of it.

Did you receive focused, direct, & honest feedback from your Observers?
Absolutely.  The observers played a pivotal role in my self-development. They were completely honest (too honest at times) and allowed me to see where I was falling short, and where I was flourishing.

Tell the readers about the coaching calls. What were they like?
It was a combination of meditation and therapy.  I always left the coaching calls with a very focused understanding of what my next goals were for the next session.   I left each one feeling the change I had been specifically working on.

How many times have you been through the workshop?  Are they still helpful?
Twice. The first time was for me, the second was for two of my employees  I didn’t realize at the time how much more I learned in the second session.

Do you feel you are more emotionally competent?
Absolutely. Although I still have the same frustrations and concerns with my personal and business life, I feel I am able to curb my emotions, react better with my employees and my family, and remain calm while working through the issue rather than becoming completely overwhelmed and reactive to the issue I’m dealing with.

If so, can you share an experience where it helped you?
I never actually yell at my employees. However, prior to completing the MYT program, I had a history of making my employees feel inferior and even fear me when I started asking questions because of the way I interacted with them and made them feel. I vividly remember a time when my VP of Operations was coming to me with bad news about our largest customer who was not going to receive product the day it was suppose to ship. Normally, I would give him “the face.” which said much more than I wanted it to. Instead, I told him I appreciate him telling me before it shipped and we can use the situation of not hitting the ship date as an “opportunity for growth,” so that it does not happen again by examining why it happened and properly addressing the issue.  It has allowed him not to fear giving me bad news. I still feel the same frustrations inside, but I have learned to let them go much quicker and be more effective at solving the problem rather than harping on it.

Was attending MYT worth the investment and if so how can you quantify it?
Every penny. It is extremely difficult to quantify. I feel like I found the person I want to be instead of the person I was becoming. It has helped in my personal life as well my business. While it might not be AmEx’s motto—in fact, I believe it is Visa’s—the experience was “Priceless!”

Darren Slosberg is the CEO of Legacy Converting, Inc.

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MYT Participant Interview: Mark Wander

How did you hear about MYT and its EQ work?
As a representative of Terra Capital Partners I was invited to attend an education day for AMPF advisors in the NY Metro area. A portion of the day’s itinerary was a presentation by Art DeLorenzo as an introduction of MYT and EQ vs. IQ. I have known Art for many years; he has always been of help to my business by virtue of his industry experience and willingness to connect me to advisors with whom he thought should hear our story. I did not know of MYT, nor did I have any idea what the company represented due to the fact that I hadn’t seen or spoken with Art in years. I was intrigued by his presentation on both a personal and professional level.

What was your first experience like?
My first experience was extremely positive. I participated in an all-day session with Art and his colleagues as an intro to the upcoming program that I was to partake in. There were approximately a dozen students like myself whose interests were similar to mine. How do I reduce my level of stress and at the same time increase my quality of life both personally and professionally? I thought I was not the best candidate for this program based on the fact that I have always viewed stress as a great motivator and something that has kept me sharp.

How did you react to your IDP and do you still refer to it?
I viewed my IDP as very accurate and commensurate with my own assessment of myself. It helped to identify certain strengths and areas of improvement with much more depth than I had ever considered or thought about. I still refer to my IDP.

Did you receive focused, direct and honest feedback from your “observers”?
Without question. One was my wife and the other was a colleague I had been partnered with for over 10 years.

Tell the readers about the coaching calls. What were they like?
My coaching calls were unconventional as compared to mine and the coach’s expectations I’m sure. We attempted to stay on track but could not help but to address real life experiences, thoughts, concerns, etc. The calls for me became less structured as time went on and more personal and meaningful. They were not diluted and were extremely pinpointed to specific actions for areas of improvement. I could not have been happier. Thanks Aneel & Shani!

How many times have you been through the workshop?  Are they still helpful?
Once so far. Intending to revisit.

Do you feel you are more emotionally competent?
I feel I have more control in regards to my thought process and how to consider and bring to the table various options. I feel I have an enhanced ability to steer my thoughts and open up additional possibilities (positive or negative) as opposed to embracing the first reaction.

Can you share an experience where it helped you?
I tend to be of an “all or nothing” mindset. If I don’t fully commit to something I tend to lose interest or not follow through. I am very competitive. MYT has taught me to compromise. The compromise has allowed me to embrace such things that perhaps I would have simply let slip through the cracks in the past. Many of these things that I have embraced as a result of compromise have enhanced my life both personally and professionally.

Was attending MYT worth the investment and if so how can you quantify it?
Yes. Most importantly techniques I have learned have given me a greater understanding of perhaps some of the stresses my family may experience (wife and 12-year-old twins) and how to redirect those stresses to a positive and productive result.

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MYT Participant Interview: David Morales

How did you hear about MYT and its EQ work?
I first learned about MYT through my boss, Jason Slosberg, who mentioned he was bringing a consultant in from this organization to help our company improve its employees and culture.

What was your first experience like?
My first interaction was with Art Delorenzo, who took a few moments to interview me. I was a bit apprehensive at first as I didn’t know where this would lead, but I would soon find out I was about to embark on a journey that would ultimately improve my stress and thought process, allowing me to think more clearly and create a greater overall awareness of my emotions and how they impact those around me.

How did you react to your IDP and do you still refer to it?
I took the series of exams, and just from my answers I could tell I was under a great deal of stress but didn’t know how the answers to my questions would play a role in this whole thing. When I finally received my IDP and read my current emotional state and the plan they were recommending for improvement, I was amazed at how accurate of a picture they were painting. I remember saying to myself, “This is EXACTLY me.” I was VERY impressed, still skeptical, but very impressed.

Did you receive focused, direct, & honest feedback from your “observers?”
I chose my 2 observers and received excellent feedback from them. Some of the things they mentioned were habits I didn’t know I had formed, and they worked with me to keep me on track and headed towards accomplishing my IDP goals.

What were the coaching calls like?
I coupled my observer feedback with coaching calls that I received from Aneel and Shani. These calls were a great source of encouragement, inspiration and motivation to continue my progress and instill a sense of pride and accomplishment. I was feeling more relaxed and was developing new thought processes that were allowing me to cope with my stress triggers in a more productive manner.

How many times have you been through the workshop?
I went through this workshop once, and as I apply the techniques, I’ve heard from my employees that I’m a much different person. They actually enjoy interacting with me again. I had allowed the stresses of my job to alienate me from the very people I counted on the most and I wasn’t even aware that I was doing it. It led to a very negative work environment and was not pleasant for anyone.

Do you feel you are more emotionally competent?  If so, can you share an experience where it helped you?
I believe I’ve come a long way since Art, Aneel and Shani and I first met. I thank them for all of their efforts and the patience and understanding they, themselves, demonstrated while working with me. My personal life at home has benefitted from the great strides taken through this program and my relationship with my wife and daughters is vastly improved.  I know this because my daughters will now ask me to come and sit with them and talk and hang out and that’s something we hadn’t done together in a long time. I continue to treasure those moments.

Was attending MYT worth the investment and if so how can you quantify it?
The investment my company made in MYT is truly invaluable and can be measured only by my improved outlook and performance at work, the improved relationships in my life, both professional and personal, and quality and longevity of life. How could anyone ever put a price tag on that?

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MYT Participant Interview: Patrick T. Wayman

How did you hear about MYT and its EQ work?
I became aware of the MYT Program through Art DeLorenzo. At the time myself and my business partners engaged Art for his consulting services.  Art felt that we could all benefit from the tools that MYT provides.

What was your first experience like? 
My first experience was extremely positive. Spending a full day working with Art, Shani and Aneel was eye opening, to say the least. My sense following that day was that I could vastly improve the quality of my life on all fronts if I elected to embrace the concepts and tools outlined in the program.

How did you react to your IDP and do you still refer to it?
I felt that my IDP was very accurate. The exercise and resulting document enabled me to leverage personal strengths and identify areas for personal development.

Did you receive focused, direct, & honest feedback from your “observers?”
My observers assisted in keeping me accountable.  Additionally, in conversations with them, we discussed not just my actions, behavior and progress, but the concepts of the program on a broader level, which furthered my self-awareness.

Tell the readers about the coaching calls—what were they like?
The coaching calls provided a forum to discuss what I believed was working for me, and to better identify areas for continued development and growth. What’s more, I was given tangible to-do’s, which I could implement immediately to further my personal development. Specifically, these action items enabled me to continue to reduce stress, increase productivity and expand self-awareness.

Do you feel you are more emotionally competent?
I absolutely feel more emotionally competent as a function of the program. My level of anxiety has decreased, I am more organized, focused, and certainly better equipped to deal with difficult interpersonal situations. I am happier at work and home. For 25 years, my crutch for dealing with stress, problems and difficult situations was smoking cigarettes—more than a pack a day!  I am now a non-smoker. I firmly believe this was also a function of MYT and the skill sets I developed.

Was attending MYT worth the investment and if so how can you quantify it?
I believe that the program was one of the best business and personal investments I have ever made. Quantifying my “return” is difficult.  I can say, however, the “return” has and continues to be multifold. As long as I continue to work on the skill sets given to me through MYT, I suspect my return on investment will only increase.

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MYT Participant Interview: Dan Dalio

How did you hear about MYT and its EQ work?
Numerous clients had mentioned MYT and EQ Not IQ.

What was your first experience like?
A life changer. Art and his team gave me the tools to help me begin to learn to manage my EQ. The results have produced a tremendous impact on those around me, family, friends, and our staff. I am much more focused on the present and spend much less time brewing on my anxiety.

How did you react to your IDP and do you still refer to it?
I felt that my IDP was accurate. Yes, I do refer to it most days. I keep the EQ materials on my iPad for easy reference.

Did you receive focused, direct and honest feedback from your observers?
My spouse was my observer. I work independently from my home and was not able to have a normal observer. However, she was very helpful, honest and candid and has noticed changes in my EQ.

Tell the readers about the coaching calls. What were they like?
Coaching calls were very useful although a video call would be better. The EQ team was very direct and professional. The calls help me/reminded me to stay more focused on my daily EQ routines.

How many times have you been through the workshop?
Once.

Do you feel you are more emotionally competent?
Completely more competent.

If so, can you share an experience where it helped you?
I was able to stay focused and more calm during a recent medical situation that could have been a critical event. I focused on my ‘good things’ list and did my best to stay away from the cognitive distortions that were lurking.

Was attending MYT worth the investment and if so how can you quantify it?
It was worth the investment. I would pay even more for a two day event. I felt that there was too much info for one day. This program should be mandatory for anyone in leadership or ownership. I will be providing this program to our entire staff over the next year and as time permits.

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MYT Participant Interview: Bonnie Marcus

How did you hear about MYT and its EQ work?
I know Art DeLorenzo and he personally recommended the course.

What was your first experience like?
I thoroughly enjoyed the workshop and the opportunity to interact with the other participants and coaches. In the first session I learned a lot about some of my triggers and gained important tools to manage my stress.

How did you react to your IDP and do you still refer to it?
I thought the IDP was spot on. Over the course of the training, my circumstances changed, which caused more stress than was initially documented. I worked with the coaches to modify my plan and find solutions to better manage that stress.

Did you receive focused, direct, & honest feedback from your “observers?”
Yes.

Tell the readers about the coaching calls—what were they like?
In just 20 minutes the coaches were able to help me pinpoint my triggers and recommend techniques for me to better manage my stress on a daily basis. These calls were extremely helpful.

How many times have you been through the workshop?
Once.

Do you feel you are more emotionally competent?
Yes. I am much more self-aware, which is the important first step. I understand how stress affects me and what methods work best for me in my life to manage the stress. I feel more balanced and even-keeled as a result, which translates into more productive time for me—less worrying, better sleep.

If so, can you share an experience where it helped you?
I was having a great deal of difficulty sleeping during my engagement with MYT. I no longer have interrupted sleep and have found ways to relax and unplug. This has helped me in my personal and professional life. I bring much more energy and focus to my relationships and my work.

Was attending MYT worth the investment and if so how can you quantify it?
Yes. Priceless (can’t quantify it).

Bonnie Marcus, M.Ed., CEC, is a Certified Executive Coach, author, and professional speaker. As the founder and principal of Women’s Success Coaching, Bonnie assists professional women to position and promote themselves to advance their careers. With 20+ years of sales and management experience, Bonnie has an extensive business background including CEO of a ServiceMaster company and VP of Sales at Medical Staffing Network and two others national companies in the healthcare and software industries.  She has held executive positions in startup companies and Fortune 500 companies. Forbes.com honored Women’s Success Coaching in 2010, 2011, and 2012 as one of the top 100 websites for professional women stating, “Women’s Success Coaching weighs on the many building blocks of empowering women in business, from assertive communication to self promotion to sensitivity training.” Her weekly radio show, GPS Your Career: A Woman’s Guide To Success, provides practical tips and resources for professional women to succeed in business. Bonnie is a contributing writer for Forbes.com. Her articles have also been published in ForbesWoman, WomenEntrepreneur, Central Valley Business Times. She has been featured in the Wall Street Journal and CIO Magazine. Bonnie received a BA from Connecticut College and a M.Ed. from New York University.

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MYT Participant Interview: Maxwell Hoffman

How did you hear about MYT and its EQ work?
I heard about the program through my regional manager at Ameriprise Financial. What was your first experience like? The experience with this program was positive, filled with different experiences and a lot of dialogue to improve awareness and stress awareness practices.

How did you react to your IDP – Individual Development Plan – and do you still refer to it?
I definitely took a positive approach to the feedback that was established and I have grown significantly as I have taken the time to improve my experiences with people and my relationships. I have been able to have relaxing experiences without heavy anxiety.

Tell the readers about the coaching calls – what were they like?
Coaching calls while brief, only 30 minutes normally in duration, were with two individuals who teach the program and they are calm and supportive as they provide growth and assistance as you deal with your IDP.

How many times have you been through the workshop?
Once.

Was attending MYT worth the investment and if so, can you quantify it?
The time and money spent attending this program is well worth it. I highly recommend it.

MYT Participant Interview: Ashley Clark

I have been through  MYT once, in 2011, and heard about it through my employer; they signed me up for the workshop as an opportunity to improve my EQ skills. I enjoyed the first meeting very much. Everyone involved is friendly, outgoing and obviously very knowledgeable about what they’re doing. It was interesting to hear many ideas I had already been introduced to through self-help and new age philosophies explained in scientific terms. My IDP was not a surprise, although many of the exercises were very helpful and took some of my already established practices to the next level. The observer element is very useful and can be quite unexpected; one of my observers was shocked that instead of looking for all the things I did ‘wrong’ in a given week, she was asked to focus in on and remind me of the things I did ‘right’ and give me specific compliments relating to those things.

The coaching calls were extremely valuable to me; I miss them. Shani and Aneel are amazing at what they do, pulling threads of ideas and thoughts from conversation and tying them back to the IDP while putting them to good use in helping maintain a balanced EQ. I have integrated a few key elements into my life, such as specific gratitudes, meditations and thought records. They help me manage anger and see situations for what they really are.

MYT was a valuable workshop, not only in giving me specific areas where I could move myself and my practices to a higher level, but also in helping me evaluate my life, the stressors in it and my ability to deal with those stressors competently and with patience and ease. My stress has decreased since. My ability to remain calm in daily interactions and focus on solutions has greatly increased.

Past Participant Interview: Wendy Gorman

I learned about the MYT workshop through Art DeLorenzo and I was overwhelmed when he invited me to participate in the program.  I was beginning a new job and my personal life was in a state of transition. Timing is everything, and the MYT process gave me an opportunity to evolve. Eager to change my life, I read Stress Free for Good and tried to find myself in the examples detailed. What stood out for me was that I should focus my energy on things that I could control  and let go of things that were beyond my ability to change. Next, I responded to the questionnaire that created my personal IDP. I was eager to learn how I could channel my energy more positively and become a stronger person emotionally. The LifeSkill practices have helped me to stay positive and appreciate all of the blessings in my life.

Managing stress is a day-to-day battle, and it is helpful to focus on the good things in life when a particular day or event seems overwhelming mentally and emotionally. Life is unpredictable and the focus of  MYT is to always prioritize the important things in life and devalue those things that are bothersome and insignificant. There is a short story called “The Mayonnaise Jar” that reminds me of the MYT workshop. The story reads as follows:

When things in your life seem almost too much to handle, When 24 hours in a day is not enough; remember the mayonnaise jar and 2 cups of coffee.

A professor stood before his philosophy class and had some items in front of him. 

When the class  began, he picked up a very large and empty mayonnaise jar and started to fill it with golf balls. 

He then asked the students if the jar was full. They agreed that it was. 

The professor then picked up a box of pebbles and poured it into the jar.  He shook the jar lightly.  The pebbles rolled into the open areas between the golf balls. 

He then asked the students again if the jar was full.  They agreed it was. 

The professor next picked up a box of sand and poured it into the jar.  Of course, the sand filled up everything else. 

He asked once more if the jar was full. 

The students responded with a unanimous ‘yes.’

The professor then produced two cups of coffee from under the table and poured the entire contents into the jar, effectively filling the empty space between the sand. 

The students laughed. 

Now, said the professor, as the laughter subsided, I want you to recognize that this jar represents your life.  

The golf balls are the important things: God, family, children, health, friends and favorite passions. Things that if everything else was lost and  only they remained, your life would still be full. 

The pebbles are the things that matter like your job, house and car. 

The sand is everything else: the small stuff. 

If you put the sand into the jar first, he continued, there is no room for the pebbles or the golf balls.  The same goes for life. 

If you spend all your time and energy on the small stuff, you will never have room for the things that are important to you. So, pay attention to the things that are critical to your happiness.  Play with your children, take time to get medical checkups. Take your partner to dinner. 

There will always be time to clean the house and fix the dripping tap. 

Take care of the golf balls first – things that really matter. Set your priorities. The rest is just sand. 

One of the students raised her hand and inquired what the coffee represented. The professor smiled and said I’m glad you asked. 

It just goes to show you that no matter how full your life may seem, there’s always room for a couple of cups of coffee with a friend. 

The MYT workshop provides a plan and details the steps that help make the search for peace and happiness attainable. I am lucky to have had the opportunity to attend MYT.

Wendy Gorman
Marinaccio, Sangirardi & Associates | A financial advisory practice of Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc.

Photo: Hourglass by flickr user John-Morgan.

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Interview with Joseph Tortorella

How did you hear about MYT and its EQ work?
Our company has been working with Mr. DeLorenzo for the last three years. We have been involved in many aspects of leadership training and EQ. It was here we learned about MYT.

What was your first experience like?
My experience made me aware of obvious things we seem to forget and take for granted. I was appreciative that the MYT team had us focus on the everyday gifts we have and the ability we have to make change and have awareness within ourselves to live a happier and healthy life while still influencing people around us due to the fact that our awareness and using the tools we have learned can and will help others we interact with in their lives.

How did you react to your IDP (Individual Development Plan) and do you still refer to it?
My IDP gave me confirmation in the areas of my life that I knew I struggled with, it also told me things I already was aware of. What my IDP also did for me was show me what some of the actions in my life that I was not directly in control of that I dismissed or those areas difficult areas that I closed myself down to. It was over the course of going through my IDP and reaching deep within myself and thinking back of how the dismissal of those items or believing they would fix themselves. With those particular areas I refer to my IDP to help remind myself to navigate through it.

Did you receive focused, direct, and honest feedback from your “observers”?
The feedback I received was honest and open. We have had some difficulty in being consistent in receiving feedback from my followers when I did refer back to my IDP and workbook for reminders.

Tell the readers about the coaching calls. What were they like?
The coaching calls were very helpful in bringing my thoughts and difficulties to light. It was more helpful for me to speak openly to Shani and Aneel. It allowed me to express my thoughts and feelings. It allowed them to not only have open dialogue with me versus an e-mail or reading from a book or workbook. It helped me and them to actually hear what I was verbalizing not only with any cognitive distortions that we use in our everyday lives but more so it allowed them to hear and feel what I thinking and doing, it allows for personal dialogue between us all.

How many times have you been through the workshop?
Twice.

Are they still helpful? Do you feel you are more emotionally competent? If so, can you share an experience where it helped you?
They are very helpful. Emotional competence comes from within and having the ability to learn about one’s self and making a consistent effort to apply the changes and be aware of yourself is a constant effort where you have to live it and breathe it everyday. Even if you apply 15% of the program it will change the quality of your life and by applying that you tend to pick up and retain more of it because you live it every day and there will be moments of small victories that you will directly attribute from this program.

Was attending MYT worth the investment and if so how can you quantify it?
MYT is worth the investment it may not all stick due to the fact that we become so automatic in   our lives we forget to appreciate the obvious things around us and change is not always easy. I appreciated it more because once you break it down its common sense that we tend to forget these days. It personally has made me appreciate myself, my surroundings and the realization that you control your path. It’s a matter of you wanting to believe, make the change and communicating it with yourself and others around you.